Oh, The Side Affects

Side affects, Side affects, side affects. It’s what us Crohnie’s deal with. And man, let me tell you, I am feelin’ them. I am off of my IV steroids and onto the oral. With the IV I was having serious issues sleeping, like I was the energizer bunny 24/7. It was not okay. Trazadone was my miracle drug to sleep. Hey, I love having energy, but who doesn’t want a good nights sleep? It seems though, that side affect is going away slowly now that I’ve been on PO Prednisone.

One side affect PO prednisone gives me that I absolutely DREAD, is the bloat, weight gain, and “moon face”. This is a nightmare to me. I feel crappy enough inside at times, the least this disease could ensure me is looking good on the outside! haha Don’t get me wrong, I don’t think I am fat or ugly; I still have my confidence. And I know that I notice it more than the people around me but it still affects me. When I was on prednisone for nine months I gained a lot of weight, 20 lbs on my small 5’0 frame. You all may not think that is a lot, but when it’s you it is a different story. I will be scarred for life because of an ex-boyfriends friend’s comment. I wanted to believe my moon face wasn’t as noticeable to other people as it was to me… But I was wrong. “You’re dating someone with a double chin?!” Yes, that was exactly what he said. Who would say such a thing?! What a jerk! From that day on I have been so self conscious about this. Especially now being single and if a guy comes along it’s something I constantly think about. I work out twice as hard at the gym, even though I know it is all hormonal/water weight that isn’t going to be shed until I come off of the steroids. I wake up every morning with a swollen face. It’s embarrassing. I know I’m probably making a big deal of this but it is a big deal to me, and I’m sure if it’s happened to you, you can relate.

As a Crohnie, we have to weigh the side affects with how we feel inside. Because after all, we are just treating the symptoms. I’ve been on several different medications that I’ve had to come off of because the side affects were unbearable, others just because they didn’t work. I know I have been asked about what I’ve been on in the past and how it’s worked. So this post I want to share all that information. It’s just part of the journey, we’re all guinea pigs on the path to finding a cure to this unpredictable disease.

In the first years of my battle with Crohn’s disease when I was being treated in Springfield there was a lot of medicines not yet out. I started with all oral medicine including the ones listed below, I promise you there was more but I just can’t possibly remember them all. I also have written next to them the reason or side affect for me coming off of them. I think a lot of these first medications, I was too sick for them to actually work the way they should. I was on several doses of prednisone (oral and IV) in between most of these as well.

1. Asacol– just didn’t give me any relief

2. Imuran- again, just didn’t work

3. Human Growth Hormone Injection- this was used by my endocrinologist because I was very, very tiny. But I will say it had some affect on my stomach because I felt AMAZING on it! And it helped me reach a whopping 5 feet tall! 😀

4. Remicade Infusion- I had some benefits of my stomach feeling better, but the side affects were unbearable. I basically felt like I had the flu for two months after my injection. My doctor told me I probably had some sort of drawn out allergic reaction because I’m allergic to cats and some animals and there are still traces of animal parts in the infusion. Made a little bit of sense, but I had to come off of it after two infusions.

5. Amitriptyline- My doctor put me on this because he thought I might have a component of IBS and this has been known to work really well. Well, I could write a novel about my experience with this medication. It is used primarily to treat depression but I am advising anyone who takes this to be SO SO SO careful with it. Monitor your every move and thought. I am saying this because I went through hell my senior year of high school on this. My stomach felt amazing, but my head not so much. I was deeply depressed, crazy, and suicidal. This was not the normal Michelle. I was a happy, optimistic person. I know how to deal with anxiety and depression and they were never an issue with me. I cried day in and day out on this medicine. Got in screaming fights with my mom (we never fight, we are best friends) but everyone told my mom it was “just how teenagers are”. They were so wrong. In every way possible. I really don’t think I’d be alive if it wasn’t for my mom. She has IBS and so decided to try it as well. Well, she noticed.. She started going crazy too. The same behavior. And to think people actually take this to treat what it was giving me. I was on 10mg and the normal dose for a depressed person is something crazy like 150mg. I know this is a controversial issue and I don’t mean to offend anyone but these types of medications are a lot of the cause for people’s depression and anxiety, they cause it. Moral of the story, be very careful with this stuff. It is poison to your brain.

My doctor then told me he basically had nothing left to try so we got a second opinion in Boston. My first doctor at Boston Children’s Hospital, Dr. Esser’s was great.

5. Humira- worked great Crohn’s wise… but… I was a stubborn teenager in high school and refused to keep giving myself the shot. I get poked and protted all the time I am not afraid of needles or shots but it was absolutely the most painful injection I have ever had in my whole entire life. I did try it again later but for some reason it didn’t work as good. I’m not sure if I had built up a sort of immunity to it but it didn’t show the same results as it did my first course of it.

6. Methatrexate & Cimzia- My doctor used “double therapy” on me and I was on these two drugs at the same time. I felt pretty good on this, but when he did the colonoscopy to make sure the inflammation and symptoms were going away (aka the drug was working) he didn’t like the results.  I still had a substantial amount of active disease, so on to the next one.

7. 6-MP- Well this was an interesting one. My hair started falling out.. ALOT. I went to get my hair highlighted, as I usually do. She used nothing different. Chunks of my hair started falling out.. It was terrifying. I looked up the side affects and that was one of them. I don’t recall if this drug actually worked but I came off of it as soon as possible. And thinking about it I’m guessing it didn’t have much benefit to my disease.

8. Tacrolimus (Tac)- This drug was used as a substitute basically for the prednisone, and I did show benefit from it. One side affect from it though my doctor had never heard of before me was severe bone and nerve pain. So for this I was prescribed Neurontin, which is a nerve pain medication, but I couldn’t take it because it made my head crazy. I dealt with the bone pain (he told me it may have been my bone marrow swelling) for as long as I could and I ended up having to come off of this medication anyways because it was only a short term fix.

When my doctor moved I started seeing a new doctor, Dr. Snapper, who was partly in children medicine and partly in adult. He’s great! He has also tried many medications with me.

9. Thalidomide- This drug was scary. I was still on the Tac while using this as well. I had to basically sign my life away. Not that I was planning on it but if I was to get pregnant it was basically federally mandated I get an abortion. If I was getting blood drawn or anything I had to let the phlebotomist know I was on it to make sure she wasn’t pregnant or breast feeding because it is SO harmful to an unborn child. I felt pretty good, disease wise, on this so my doctor did a colonoscopy and again wasn’t satisfied with the results. I still had a lot of active disease.

9. Tysabri Infusion- This infusion was also scary, there was a risk of developing a rare brain virus that was usually fatal. There was a blood test you got before to rule out that you would develop this rare virus, but the risk was still very real. I was willing to try anything though. Of course, just my luck.. I got every side affect besides the rare brain virus. I had a severe cold and was run down 24/7 on this medication. I could feel my immune system being completely wiped out. It was awful. My stomach did feel a little bit better but I couldn’t function day to day which wasn’t worth it. My colonoscopy also didn’t have the best results as usual.

10. Micophenolate- This just plain old didn’t work.

11. Stelara Injection- This is a new medication to the IBD world, it is usually used for Psoriasis. It is my most recent medication. The side affects I got from it were terrible cystic acne, cold/flu symptoms about a week after the injection, infections (UTIs, yeast infections, sinus infections, ear piercing infections, etc.). I tried as hard as I could to deal with the side affects until it was time for a routine colonoscopy to see if the medication was in fact giving me some improvement. My stomach felt good but to our surprise my insides didn’t reflect that.

Right now I am in a “wash out” period of the Stelara. Basically, this means I have to be off of this medication for 12 weeks before I can do the fecal transplant trial in Boston I have previously written about. All of these medications have, like I said before, been a battle between side affects and controlling my disease. Some side affects more serious than others. Several of these medications can cause serious incurable cancers. We have to have the mind-set of what it is to feel good, we have to look to the future. If a medication works for us we have to weigh how much we want to deal with. Crohn’s disease is still essentially a mystery, slowly revealing new clues. But, in the mean time while these clues and steps are being improved upon our doctors are just doing their best to control our symptoms.

While I sit here and share with you my past experience with medication I am starting to feel better about my moon face. It doesn’t seem so bad after all. If a boy doesn’t like my chubby cheeks and double chin every once in a while then he can go take a hike! HA! Well, one of my favorite shows is on now… The Bachelor. So I am going to go watch me some Juan Pablo and forget about my moon face for a little bit. Hope you all have a great night and just know you are not alone with all of this rif raf of side affects. It is just another one of the pain in the asses we Crohnie’s have to deal with, pun definitely intended.

Much love,

Moon Face Michelle 🙂

5 thoughts on “Oh, The Side Affects

  1. Pingback: Side Effects | Fearless in Sickness

  2. Good article. I’m currently on 6mp and the humira (3 years) i also went through the gambit of meds. great that you wrote down all your side effects. I wish i did that. The worst so far for me has been prednisone ( i was on for 3-4 years)…. I grew crazy amounts of hair on chest and back. (not gorilla crazy but crazy for me) Like the moon face comment btw

    • Thanks! Yeah I tried to keep good track of my side affects, I’m sure I’m missing a few along the line but those are the most significant! I previously did an article on my side affects from prednisone, this bout of it I don’t sleep unless I take a heavy duty sleep medicine. But thanks again, I’m glad you enjoyed reading it! 🙂

  3. Reblogged this on Stacey Dearest and commented:
    “haha Don’t get me wrong, I don’t think I am fat or ugly; I still have my confidence. And I know that I notice it more than the people around me but it still affects me. When I was on prednisone for nine months I gained a lot of weight, 20 lbs on my small 5’0 frame. You all may not think that is a lot, but when it’s you it is a different story”
    -I’ve never been small, but I’ve been confident and comfortable in my skin. I’ve been struggling to find the words to express how I feel without sounding shallow and jaded, but this is most definitely the relatable post I’ve stumbled across this far.

    “I wake up every morning with a swollen face. It’s embarrassing. I know I’m probably making a big deal of this but it is a big deal to me, and I’m sure if it’s happened to you, you can relate.”

    I’ve come to realize that perspective is everything. If you’ve only ever had a hangnail, a splinter is going to suck. If you’ve managed to live your whole life only stubbing your toe, a broken ankle is going to hurt like hell.
    I know what I’ve been through, but it’s something that a lot of people can’t and won’t ever be able to relate to. Waking up and looking into the mirror each morning is difficult. Absolutely. There are some days that I get ready without turning the bathroom light, just because I’d rather seek a little comfort in the denial..
    At least now my reflection can be found in the mirror hanging on my above my bathroom sink, rather than in the dingy metal plate in my hospital room. I have the right to feel sorry for myself, but I know that I’ve been in worse places. So it’s okay to be a little vain once in a while, this is a big deal.

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